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Important Information for Parents and Guardians of Third Grade Students

Being a good reader is critical for a student to be successful in school. In 2013, the Mississippi Legislature passed the Literacy-Based Promotion Act to ensure that students exit the 3rd grade reading at or above grade level.

Due to the Literacy Based Promotion Act, all 3rd grade students will take a test at the end of the year to determine promotion to 4th grade. If your child is reading below grade level at the end of 3rd grade, you will be informed in writing that your child will not be promoted to 4th grade.

All 3rd grade students will take a test in April to determine promotion to 4th grade. A retest will be given for students who fail the April assessment in May. A third retest opportunity will be provided during the summer. If your child does not pass the end of year assessment, you will be informed in writing that your child will not be promoted to 4th grade unless he/she qualifies for an exemption. You will receive regular reports from your child’s school about his/her progress.

 

What is MPSD doing to prepare students for this test?

In order to ensure that classroom instruction is meeting the needs of students, the Meridian Public School District gives a set of short assessments three times each year. (Assessments are given in August, December and April.) The results of the assessments are used to set reading goals for each school, each grade level and each student. The assessments will help identify students who need intensive reading instruction and intervention and will also provide useful information to help teachers shape instruction to meet the needs of students. Letters are sent home to the parents of all children after each assessment so parents can be informed of their child’s progress in learning to read.

You will receive regular reports from your child’s school about his/her progress.

 

What can you do to help?

Kindergarten Parents/Guardians:

  • Read to your child every day.
  • Read books and poems that rhyme with your child.
  • Take turns saying words that rhyme.
  • Talk about letters and the sounds they represent.
  • Practice writing the letters as you talk about them.
  • Encourage your child to “sound out” simple words.
  • Ask your child to spell simple words.

First Grade Parents/Guardians

  • Read with your child every day.
  • Take turns reading aloud. (I read to you, you read to me.)
  • Encourage your child to “sound out” simple words. Be patient and give your child time to do this. Remind your child to look closely at the first letter or letters of the word.
  • When your child makes a mistake, gently point out the letters he or she read incorrectly.
  • Play word games. Ask your child to sound out a word as you change it from mat to fat to sat or from sat to sag or from sap to sip.
  • Ask your child to spell simple words.

 

Second Grade Parents/Guardians

  • Read with your child every day.
  • Encourage reading as a free-time activity.
  • Take turns reading aloud. (I read to you, you read to me.)
  • Encourage your child to “sound out” words. When your child has sounded out an unfamiliar word, have him or her re-read that sentence. Often children are so busy figuring out the word they lose the meaning of what they have just read.
  • Explain how related words have similar spellings and meanings. Show how a word like knowledge, for example, relates to a work like know.
  • Have your child create a writing checklist with reminders such as, “Do all of my sentences start with a capital letter? Yes/No.”
  • Use new words your child has learned in flash card drills. This can help your child automatically recognize and read words.

 

Third Grade Parents/Guardians

  • Turn reading into something special. Take your kids to the library or local bookstore. Have a favorite place for books in your home.
  • Read with your child every day.
  • Encourage reading as a free-time activity.
  • Let your child see you use a dictionary. Say, “Hmm, I’m not sure what that word means…I think I’ll look it up.”
  • Read different types of books or magazines to expose your child to different types of writing. Some children, especially boys, prefer nonfiction.
  • Explain how related words have similar spellings and meanings. Show how a word like knowledge, for example, relates to a work like know.
  • Have your child create a writing checklist with reminders such as, “Do all of my sentences start with a capital letter? Yes/No.”
  • Show your child how to summarize a story in a few sentences or how to make predictions about what might happen next. Both strategies help children comprehend and remember.

 

For More Information and Ways to Help, visit http://www.mpsd.k12.ms.us/?DivisionID=8397&DepartmentID=22092&ToggleSideNav=

 

Questions?

If you have any questions, please contact your child’s principal and/or teacher.

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